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Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of Leaching of fully radioactive high-level waste glass found in the catalog.

Leaching of fully radioactive high-level waste glass

D. J. Bradley

Leaching of fully radioactive high-level waste glass

by D. J. Bradley

  • 394 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of Energy, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, for sale by the National Technical Information Service] in Richland, Wash, [Springfield, Va .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Leaching.,
  • Radioactive wastes -- Testing.,
  • Reactor fuel reprocessing.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementD. J. Bradley.
    SeriesPNL : 2664, PNL (Series) -- 2664.
    ContributionsUnited States. Dept. of Energy., Pacific Northwest Laboratory.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination108 p. in various pagings :
    Number of Pages108
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15243571M

    The High-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program at Nuclear Fuel Services JAMES P. DUCKWORTH Chapter 5, DOI: /bach Publication Date (Print): September 1, . SOLIDIFIED REPROCESSING WASTE GOALS FOR HIGH-LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE MANAGE­ MENT A. A voidance of Unnecessary Risk 1. TREATMENT 2. TRANSPORTATION 3. STORAGE 4. DISPOSAL B. Equitable Distribution of Risk DEVELOPING A RESPONSIBLE RADIOACTIVE WASTE MAN AGEMENT PROGRAM A. Military Reprocessing Waste B. High-Level Waste From Commercial Nuclear.

    I. GoalsThe public policy goals regarding "low-level" radioactive waste should be the termination of production of fuel cycle wastes and the isolation of such wastes in the safest and least environmentally damaging way ss and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) should exclude from their definition of "low-level radioactive waste" any waste having a. Vitrification is a process used to stabilize and encapsulate high-level radioactive waste. In the vitrification process, radioactive waste is mixed with a substance that will crystallize when heated (e.g., sugar, sand) and then calcined. Calcination removes water from the .

    Leach Tests of Non-glass Waste Forms. In addition toithe leaching of waste glass, the leaching of non-glass waste forms has been studied. Non-glass waste forms produbed during vitrification include crystalline material mixed in'the product and the metal that . Transport of High-Level Nuclear Waste. If the NRC licenses Yucca Mountain as the national repository, it will be necessary to transport spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste located throughout the country to the site. In April , the DOE announced its decision to proceed with a “mostly rail”.


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Leaching of fully radioactive high-level waste glass by D. J. Bradley Download PDF EPUB FB2

@article{osti_, title = {Leaching of fully radioactive high-level waste glass}, author = {Bradley, D.J.}, abstractNote = {As part of continuing Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored studies in waste management, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been conducting the High-Level Waste Immobilization Program.

The purpose of this program is to develop and demonstrate technology for. Get this from a library. Leaching of fully radioactive high-level waste glass. [D J Bradley; United States. Department of Energy.; Pacific Northwest Laboratory.]. @article{osti_, title = {Leaching studies of low-level radioactive waste forms}, author = {Dayal, R and Arora, H and Clinton, J C and Milian, L}, abstractNote = {A research program has been under way at the Brookhaven National Laboratory to investigate the radionuclide release behavior of ion exchange bead resin waste solidified in Portland cement.

Leaching of Fully Radioactive High-Level Waste Glass and Waste-Geologic Environment Interaction Studies D. BRADLEY Pacific Northwest Laboratory, operated by Battelle Memorial Institute for the U.S.

Department of Energy, Richland, WA Get this from a library. Radioactive waste in geologic storage: based on a symposium sponsored by the Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology at the th meeting of the American Chemical Society, Miami Beach, Florida, September[Sherman Fried; American Chemical Society.

Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology.; American Chemical Society. Bradley, “Leaching of Fully Radioactive High-Level Waste Glass,” PNL, Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA ().

CrossRef Google Scholar by: 8. Leaching of a waste deposit by groundwater followed by transport in an aqueous solution is a commonly occurring situation. The leach resistance of solidified waste materials in groundwater is often cited as the critical factor for the decision to use such methods of disposal for the long term isolation of high level radioactive waste [l]-[3].

Bradley, “Leaching of Fully Radioactive High Level Waste Glass and Waste-Geologic Environment Studies,” Paper No. 47, Symposium on Radioactive Waste in Geologic Storage, Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Fall Meeting, American Cited by: 4.

The Management of High-Level Radioactive Wastes by Wm. Lennemann WHAT ARE HIGH-LEVEL WASTES The terms, low-level, medium- or intermediate-level and high-level radioactive wastes are being universally used, implying different concentrations of radionuclides or radioactivity in the waste.

GLAMOR (A Critical Evaluation of the Dissolution Mechanisms of High Level Nuclear Waste Glasses in Conditions of Relevance for Geological Disposal; EC contract FIKW-CT) was a model intercomparison project, compared the GM and r(t) models over a large set of experiments, and concluded that the hypotheses of the affinity and protective layer concepts behind the models were.

Radioactive waste disposal facilities are investigated for construction in deep strata 50– m under the ground [1–5].As shown in Fig. 2, the use of clayey materials such as bentonite, and cementitious materials, such as concrete and mortar either independently or in combination as back filling materials or engineered barrier materials, has been studied.

Initial leaching characteristics of simulated nuclear waste immobilized in three alkali- borosilicate glasses (ABS-waste) were studied. The effects of matrix composition on the containment performance and degradation resistance measures were evaluated. Normalized release rates are in conformance with data reported in the literature.

High Li and Mg loadings lead to the highest initial de Cited by: 3. only on glass matrices and ceramic waste forms. Nevertheless, the only industrial process for high level waste immobilisation is vitrification with glass.

To check durability of the waste forms, several leaching methods have been defined but none of them can be considered as standard. The Soxhlet method was used to check on. fused at °C. Radioactive samples of this glass were buried in the soil in and the leaching of nuclides has been studied ever since This was closely followed by the FINGAL process, developed at Harwell, UK, where a borosilicate glass containing 25—40 wt% of.

Significant increases in the leaching rate of PNL 76–68, a complex simulated nuclear waste glass, were observed to occur in the presence of gamma radiation. Leaching characteristics of some radionuclides that are commonly encountered in radioactive waste streams from immobilized waste matrices in different cement-clay grouts have been assessed to.

A promising design for this sort of system for high-level radioactive waste processing is presented in Figure 4. In accordance with this system the high-level wastes are first steamed and then subjected to preliminary processing using fractionation technology.

To facilitate the study of the process of leaching of radioactive products by. At the Hanford site, creating glass with radioactive waste is expected to start in around orGoel said, and "the implications of our research will be much more visible by that time.".

characteristics of radioactive waste forms conditioned for storage and disposal: guidance for the development of waste acceptance criteria report by an advisory group meeting on conditioning requirements for storage and disposal of radioactive wastes. High-level waste is the highly radioactive waste material resulting from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, including liquid waste produced directly in reprocessing and any solid material derived from such liquid waste that contains fission products in sufficient concentrations; and other highly radioactive material that is determined, consistent with existing law, to require permanent.

In order to retain radioactive elements in the event of water intrusion into the repository, solid waste forms such as ceramic, cement and glass have been an important area in nuclear research. Although nuclear waste is often stored in a container isolated from the environment, waste containment material still governs the retention of active.Low-level waste (LLW) is nuclear waste that does not fit into the categorical definitions for intermediate-level waste (ILW), high-level waste (HLW), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), transuranic waste (TRU), or certain byproduct materials known as 11e(2) wastes, such as uranium mill essence, it is a definition by exclusion, and LLW is that category of radioactive wastes that do not fit.Content: Radionuclide sorption and desorption reactions with interbed materials from the Columbia River Basalt Formation / G.S.

Barney --Reactions between technetium in solution and iron-containing minerals under oxic and anoxic conditions / T.T. Vandergraaf, K.V. Ticknor, and I.M. George --Radionuclide sorption mechanisms and rates on granitic rock: determination by selective chemical.